Category Archives: teaching

Forging ahead: reflections on the first non-grad school semester

The fall semester is grinding slowly to a halt.  If you told me on the first day of classes how this semester would proceed (family ups and downs, moving our whole life, moving the kids from one school to another, … Continue reading

Posted in academia, dissertation, family, grad school, higher education, lessons learned, personal, productivity, teaching, work, writing | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

A post on Conditionally Accepted that is actually published

I remarked three weeks ago that I thought the semester was flying.  It is indeed a slippery one.  By my calendar, it is Week 9.  The great push towards the end of the semester is on. Today, I am excited … Continue reading

Posted in academia, family, grad school, higher education, lessons learned, personal, sociology, teaching, tenure, women, work, writing | 1 Comment

In loco parentis: real life role conflict and role strain

Thanks for not giving up on the blog and me.  September and October knocked me down, but I am slowly standing back up. Everywhere I look, all I see are Rogue Cheerios.  Residuals from my work and personal life are … Continue reading

Posted in academia, family, higher education, kids, lessons learned, motherhood, parenthood, personal, sociology, students, teaching, work | Leave a comment

The writing is the reward

If you’re a teacher, you are probably wondering where September went.  I know I am pretty amazed at how many things happened in the last month and how quickly this semester is flying.  In this first semester of non-graduate, non-dissertating … Continue reading

Posted in blogging, lessons learned, teaching, writing | 2 Comments

Persistence in the face of unrelenting mediocrity

After many summers of failing miserably at tending to vegetable plants, I have resigned myself to the realization that I am not a great gardener. Do you hear me, husband?  I stink at gardening. I am not even a little … Continue reading

Posted in academia, blogging, lessons learned, personal, research, students, teaching, work, writing | 4 Comments

The calm before the storm: on course prep and a reality check

I need to get over myself. I am doing exactly what I have done for semesters now: I am over prepping my courses. I’m paralyzed thinking about updating the syllabus for a course I’ve already taught because I know it … Continue reading

Posted in academia, higher education, lessons learned, reading, schools, students, teaching, work, writing | 1 Comment

A tale of two conferences: the postmortem on ASA in New York

Last weekend in New York City was productive and fun. I saw some old friends and met lots several new people (in real life and via Twitter).  I picked up some inventive teaching ideas.  I heard (mostly) first-rate research presentations. … Continue reading

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Is it possible to have status in academe without tenure?

This past year, I served as a “Visiting Lecturer” at a private, liberal arts college and this coming year, I’ll be a “Visiting Assistant Professor”.  I used to think “visiting” sounded really distinctive, like your talents were so specialized that … Continue reading

Posted in academia, dissertation, grad school, higher education, lessons learned, popular press, sociology, teaching, tenure, work, writing | 7 Comments

Dispatch from the mat: lessons on teaching gleaned from yoga boot camp

Yoga boot camp is a contradiction in terms.  Yoga, by nature, is meant to be peaceful and meditative.  The only “boot camp”-ish thing about this yoga boot camp was the 6:15 start time (and thus the 5:30 wake up call). … Continue reading

Posted in academia, blogging, health, higher education, lessons learned, students, teaching, work, yoga | 7 Comments

On teaching, writing, and teaching writing

In a recent conversation with my mother-in-law, I discussed my frustration with teaching writing.  She lamented that students really learned to write in high school and many secondary schools were failing at that task.  I wondered [aloud to her] whether … Continue reading

Posted in academia, higher education, lessons learned, reading, students, teaching, writing | 16 Comments